Is Blackhat SEO Dead?

I’m not plugged into the SEO grid any more these days. At my end of the market, there is very little point in engaging with anything remotely dodgy and much of the work is curatorial or carefully technical. From time to time though, I descend from my ivory tower to pop onto the blackhat forums to seek for interesting snippets that might inform decisions we take inside the business.

And I can’t remember the last useful lesson I took away from these forays.

Example: at one time, Bluehatseo was a must-read site, packed with interesting ways to leverage content and build at industrial scale. It wasn’t something I ever did myself, but it gave me ideas and also meant I could talk sensibly with the more aggressive side of the SEO community (god, I hate that phrase). It also seemed to work. Whether or not Eli was kidding us all, I knew anecdotally of several people making a good living on the margins of Google – moving from market to market, building one from the other till their second incomes became their first incomes and even living off the results of their affiliate schemes.

I don’t get that vibe any more. It seems that times have changed – perhaps even that Google have won their long war of attrition against the “spammers” (as they defined them). You still get the odd lonely ranter complaining in the comments under every Searchengineland blog post about how crazy it is that some of their pages have lost traffic while others have gained, but somehow you know that their “25% drop” in traffic means a dip from 18 people to 14 people or whatever.

I had the honour of working alongside Dave Naylor at Bronco – a one time King of the Black Hats whose ability to spot and exploit a hole in Google’s algorithm was peerless. Today I don’t think he’d touch black hat with a bargepole – not merely because he now occupies a different space, but because the margins just aren’t there any more. Even while I was at Bronco, at least half the work coming in was from people trying to escape from under penalties they’d brought down on themselves.

(As an aside: get me that job at Searchengineland that consists purely of rewriting each Google announcement and transcribing their Webmaster videos – that’s some serious value-add right there, my friends)

And you know what? I welcome that change. I rarely visited an affiliate site and felt enriched by the experience. It annoyed the hell of of me to sit next to my wife while she was shopping and to see her going to click on what would clearly be an affiliate site before trying to find what she actually wanted.

And as an SEO, what could be worse than negotiating link prices from a faceless Estonian blogfarm owner?

Of course, the legacy of the spam wars is still with us. There are still bots mindlessly plugging Ugg boots on comment threads everywhere (I conceded defeat on my own blog recently and installed Disqus) and people buying and selling links by the thousand, but the more I look the more it feels like these are the last shots in a war that has concluded. a sort of digital version of the Continuity IRA.

I know I have (by approximation) zero readers, but if you are a blackhat making good dollar from it as we turn the corner into 2015, I’d be interested to hear about it.

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Categories: SEO

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