Tabs, “Hidden Content” and Google

Tabs are a handy, universally understood visual metaphor that have been used for many years by designers to make manageable and usable pages. There has always been a small degree of confusion about whether or not Google treated tabbed content as ‘hidden’ content and whether or not they would penalise sites using tabs.

Following a post by John Mueller, it seems that Google have come down against tabs. They believe that tabs are a way for people to show one thing to users and another to Google.

To an extent, that’s true: it would be easy to make a short, punchy “selling” article that is seen by visitors, while hiding a whole bunch of keyword-heavy text behind a tab. Whether that’s good or bad practice is something of a religious question.

Personally, I’ve always felt – and still do – that tabs are a good way to visually organise things on a page. Here’s how I use them on my hobby site:

tabs

Now I don’t see anything inherently wrong with this. I can make a super-useful page, packed with content but organised in such a way to be navigable without a 4 mile long page.

But I think Google and I disagree on this. Recent uses of the site: command in Google have revealed that the main ‘hub’ pages for any topic have been downgraded recently in Google. Searching site:weirdisland.co.uk “yorkshire ripper” did not place the relevant page at the top, despite a reasonably solid internal link structure. Instead, the target page was under pretty much every other page on the topic.

This made me sniff around the page to see what the problem could be. The main suspect? A ‘timeline’ tab. This tab included data from all the related articles – dates and locations, all Schemafied and presented in a nice fashion. I couldn’t see any real fault with that, but looking at it again from what Google have been saying, this tab actually had more information and a higher word count than the main article itself.

tabs2

In my eyes, I had done a pretty nice job of balancing visual presentation and information, but I suspect this sort of thing is the kind of trigger for Google to downgrade a page.

As such, I’ve separated these timelines into standalone pages like this.

I feel ambivalent about this. I feel that I’ve been bullied into changing my site to fulfil an algorithmic diktat from Google that implies that my design was an attempt to trick their bots. Part of me thinks I should stand my ground and not change a thing.

However, as part of the remit I’ve given myself with that site is to use it as a testbed for such things, I’ve caved to see what happens from a Google perspective.

I will, of course, let you know what happens.

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